Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium Hero

Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium

Practice, Advocacy, and Empowerment

The Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium is a community for educators, teaching artists, and administrators.

Participants will:

  • Engage in experiential training with peers
  • Gain tangible strategies for implementation in educational settings
  • Shape the future of arts-integrated learning

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Keynote

In the keynote address, “We Gon’ Be Alright, But That Ain’t Alright: Abolitionist Teaching,” Dr. Bettina Love will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom, as opposed to reform, and moving beyond what she calls the educational survival complex. Abolitionist Teaching is built on the creativity, imagination, boldness, ingenuity, and rebellious spirit and methods of abolitionists to demand and fight for an educational system where all students are thriving, not simply surviving.

Bettina L. Love

Bettina L. Love is an award-winning author and the Athletic Association Endowed Professor at the University of Georgia. Her writing, research, teaching, and activism meet at the intersection of race, education, abolition, and Black joy. In 2020, Love co-founded the Abolitionist Teaching Network (ATN). ATN’s mission is simple: develop and support teachers and parents to fight injustice within their schools and communities. Love is the author of “We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom” and “Hip Hop’s Li’l Sistas Speak: Negotiating Hip Hop Identities and Politics in the New South.” Her work has appeared in numerous books and journals, including the English Journal, Urban Education, The Urban Review, and the Journal of LGBT Youth.

February 13, 2021

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9:00-9:15 a.m., Welcome

Speaker: Yorel Lashley

9:15–10:30 a.m., Keynote: We Gon’ Be Alright, But That Ain’t Alright: Abolitionist Teaching

Dr. Bettina Love will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom, as opposed to reform, and moving beyond what she calls the educational survival complex. Abolitionist Teaching is built on the creativity, imagination, boldness, ingenuity, and rebellious spirit and methods of abolitionists to demand and fight for an educational system where all students are thriving, not simply surviving.

NOTE: Dr. Love’s keynote will not be recorded.

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Shaping the Future of Arts Integration Through Effective Policy and Research

How can you build policies that support arts integration throughout all education spaces? In this session, we will discuss practical pathways for arts integration to transform the learning lives of all students. We will start by considering how we got to this situation where the arts are often marginalized or used in service of the STEM Monster (™). This is all wrong – the arts should be at the heart of any robust 21st century learning model – a foundational part of all holistic education. After we trace through a brief history of arts education policy that led us to this sorry state, we will save the day with a robust discussion of five practical policies that matter for arts integration throughout the learning environment and the community. Hopefully, participants will use their insights to join into a long-term WAIS community of practice to help build a strong statewide movement toward lasting change in arts education.

Speakers: Erica Halverson and Rich Halverson

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school, Middle school, High school

Theme: Policy, Advocacy

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m., BrainDance: A Movement Tool for the Brain and Body

This workshop will introduce the BrainDance, a developmental movement structure that supports organization of the mind and body through creative expression. During the session, participants will learn the basic BrainDance structure and its connection to developmental movement patterns. Following this understanding, participants will explore adaptations and creative application for their educational setting and population.

Speakers: Mariah Meyer LeFeber and Mary Patterson

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school

Theme: Cultural Relevance, SEL

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Following the Story Path

Story structure can be understood intellectually. But for storytellers, writers, and performers, a good story is experiential—practice teaches them the way that parts of a well-constructed story go together. Trial and error helps them find their way to an effective plot and ending.

Following the Story Path gives participants the tools to improvise, collaborate, and reflect on stories, and to feel when a story finds a good path to a destination and when it wanders off into the wilderness and gets lost.

Improvisation works well in the virtual classroom, and the exercises shared in this workshop will help teachers engage students in language arts, social studies, and social-emotional learning through interactive work.

The workshop will begin with an intellectual exploration of story shapes and a review of some of the latest neurological research that demonstrates the ways that stories attune our brains to empathy, compassion, and cooperation.

However, we will quickly move to experiential learning with four storytelling activities that teachers or teaching artists can use in a virtual or in-person classroom!

Speaker: Terry Kerr

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: SEL, Virtual

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m., Moving the Common Core Standards

During this workshop, participants will explore the integration of movement/dance to the academic curriculum. Emphasis will be put on actual movement experiences, practical applications of movement concepts, and an opportunity to create an outline for a lesson that integrates movement/dance into the curriculum. Strategies for virtual learning and safer in-person activities will be presented and explored.

Speaker: Maria E. Castello

Age Range: Elementary school

Theme: SEL, Safer In-Person, Virtual

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m., People and Objects in Place

The clothes we wear, our homes and the electronic devices we use – started as an idea, translated to a drawing and finally created (manufactured).

The short workshop is for participants interested in expanding their research into the world of art. Participants are encouraged to use their personal experiences as the platform to create work in this session. Participants are encouraged to utilize their natural environment, imagination and personal stories through a series of prompts to create a finished triptych (a set of three works viewed together as a series). The final images, words, or illustrations are shared at the end of the session. People and Objects in Place provides a foundation for students to understand that art is a vehicle for individuals to evolve independent judgment, elevate analytical ability, and develop social responsibility.

In light of the pandemic, Black lives Matter and the Me Too Movement – this session will aid the reimagining of self, discover new ways of seeing, and help the participants explore the law of infinite possibilities through higher learning of the arts.

Materials: Pencil, Pen, Sharpie, Sheets of Paper/Sketch Book, Camera on Phone/Laptop

Activates: Writing, Drawing, Photography

Skill Requirement: Share Screen/Email Triptych

Skill: Upload three images and display them as one image on screen

Speaker: Faisal Abdu’Allah

Age Range: Middle school, High school

Theme: SEL and culturally relevant

12:45–1:30 p.m., Community of Practice Introductory Session

Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium (WAIS) Community of Practice (CoP) provides an opportunity to engage with peers about strategies and challenges and to celebrate successes. CoPs will meet three to four times over six months and will feature structured conversations facilitated by experts. CoPs will be organized around WAIS themes which are responsive to the pressing challenges of our time, including the challenges of teaching during a pandemic, racial justice, and supporting the social and emotional wellbeing of students. Outputs of CoPs may include a list of successes and challenges, observations about the state of the field, or a white paper outlining policy strategies. Facilitators will be introduced on Saturday, February 13 (recording will be available), and participants will have the opportunity to select a CoP based on their topic of interest. This is an opportunity to engage in a supportive community while contributing to the field of Arts Integration!

1:30–2:30 p.m., Hip Hop and Social Justice Learning

This interactive, experiential workshop teaches participants how to engage student voice through the use of visuals, music, media, and hip hop. By embracing a multi-narrative perspective, participants will learn how to scaffold projects specifically using an inquiry-based, multi-modal approach to explore a range of topics while deepening language arts skills and social studies content. The workshop grew out of Tunstall’s commitment to culturally relevant pedagogy, demanding that school effectiveness be measured by the extent to which students experience intellectual growth, an appreciation of their culture as well as other cultures (“windows and mirrors”), and the development of socio-political consciousness.

Speaker: Jonathan Tunstall

Age Range: Middle school, High school

Theme: Anti-Racist Strategies

1:30–2:30 p.m., Theatre Games, Improvisation, and Story Adaptation in a Virtual World

The Covid pivot has spurred many different organizations across sectors to re-evaluate and evolve how they deliver programing. Whoopensocker is an education residency focused on creativity, expression, writing, and collaboration and a performance ensemble. Whoopensocker has begun working with traditional theatre games and improvisational activities through the lens of the virtual world and has developed fun and engaging set of activities designed to invite interactive movement and energy. This 90-minute virtual workshop is an introduction for anyone interest in the the fundamentals of improvisation, theatre games, and story adaptation. Attendees will learn some basic improvisational tools, discover ways to adapt stories in a virtual environment, and the value of saying, “Yes, and.” This workshop will give you an understanding of what makes improv important and how it can be used to build confidence and generate community. We emphasize skills such as: effective communication, receptive listening, self-confidence, thinking on your feet (or at your keyboard), and the ability to successfully utilize online meeting platforms with ease. The benefits are limitless. And best of all, it’s fun! Whoop it up!

Speaker: Jessica Jane Witham

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: Virtual

1:30–2:30 p.m., Developmental Rhythms: Understanding Children, Understanding Ourselves

This workshop takes a beginning look at the meaning of childrens’ movement. Developmental rhythms, which emerge in the womb and further develop in the first six years of life, help with the accomplishment of specific developmental, cognitive, and psychological tasks. Learning about these movement patterns will enhance and deepen your understanding of children as well as your own personality and preferred way of moving (as these rhythms aren’t just in children, they become integrated into our way of being, too). There will be some discussion about how these rhythms influence temperament. Lastly, participants will leave with suggestions for developmentally appropriate movement activities/experiences that enhance connecting with and teaching children.

Speaker: Suzanne Hastie

Age Range: Early childhood

Theme: SEL

1:30–2:30 p.m., Building Equity, Access, and Community through Artistic Partnerships

Art and music experiences are said to be universal, yet access to community arts opportunities often is not, especially in schools and neighborhoods with high levels of poverty.  Schools can expand and supplement their arts offerings by bringing in community partners, but where to start?  How do you find teaching artists, and how do you create a meaningful partnership?  Where do you look for funding?

This workshop will explore the many possibilities in creating partnerships between school communities and local teaching artists. Using an example from Lake View Elementary School in Madison, we will uncover the process of developing and building an arts-based after-school program focused on student empowerment and self-efficacy. From researching community partners to finding grant opportunities, participants will engage in reflection, research, and dialogue to guide them through this process. By the end of the session, participants will have the beginnings of a road map for goal setting, logistics, prospective partners, and potential funders to make your dream program a reality.

Speaker: Terri Felton

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school, High school

Theme: Policy & Advocacy

1:30–2:30 p.m., Sidewalk Surprises: Artful Outdoor Play Supporting Classroom Learning

Madison Children’s Museum shares Sidewalk Surprises, a project designed in 2020 to support crucial outdoor active play for children during a time of increased isolation and screen use. Learn how the museum engaged local artists, museum staff, and neighborhood association volunteers to blanket Dane County with artful sidewalk games from around the world. These solo sidewalk games encourage walking—and skipping, hopping, and jumping—through spaces, rather than gathering.

This session will include an online toolkit with dozens of game patterns that can support cross-cultural learning, math, literacy, and spatial awareness, all while creating original visual art with students and supporting their need for active outdoor play. Inspired by the book “Hopscotch Around the World” (Mary Lankford), and featuring many of the games collected in the book, Sidewalk Surprises encourages creativity and limitless spinoffs.

Practical tips will be shared for selecting chalk/paint materials that will last through multiple rainstorms, negotiating permitting and permissions at your school or in your neighborhood, safety considerations, and budgeting for large scale projects.

Participants should have a pen and paper on hand, as there will be time for brainstorming and game design, with an emphasis on inventing accessible games and adaptations for children with disabilities.

https://madisonchildrensmuseum.org/exhibits/mcm-roadshow/

Speaker: Kia Karlen

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: Safer In-Person

1:30–2:30 p.m., How to Plan a Culturally Relevant "Day of the Dead" Celebration

We will review two Latino theme holidays (Day of the Dead/Día de Los Muertos and Day of the Child/Día Del Niño) that can be incorporated using SEL as well as fun activities that will ignite your social studies goals in new and fun ways. We will review the history, do’s and don’ts, activities, and adaptations for online learning.

Speaker: Araceli Esparza

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: Cultural Relevance, SEL

2:30–3:30 p.m., Structured Networking

February 17, 2021

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12:30–1:15 p.m, Welcome & Structured Networking

1:30–2:45 p.m., Cinema Around

Cinema Around presents a workshop for arts integration with film/video production. In a creative process, practical activities are paired with in-class discussion around cinema works and its relation with learning and teaching. The goal of this creative laboratory is to involve cinema in ways of exploring the space around us. Participants will get in touch with cinematography that helps us to reflect on our own territory.

Speaker: Gustavo Jardim

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school, High school

Theme: Virtual

1:30–2:45 p.m., Implementing Drama to Create a Fair and Inclusive Arts Integrated Classroom

Drama is a collaborative art form. Through drama integration, students practice negotiation, respectful participation, and listening skills essential to partner and team work situations. In this session, participants begin with a solo activity to activate mind and body work. Then they will move on to teamwork, practicing the dramatic skills (and life skills) of collaboration, concentration, and imagination as they apply knowledge from other academic areas. The social-emotional learning emphasized is at the heart of dramatic study. Participants will use and deliver some beginning strategies that work over web-based instruction, in-class distance learning, and in traditional class settings. Several activities selected from THE FREEZE, STATUE MAKER, CRAZY SHAPES, and others will be explored.

Speaker: Karen L. Erickson

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: SEL

1:30–2:45 p.m., Building Your Fully-integrated SEL Classroom for Youth Empowerment

Participants will do an SEL dissection of a class or lesson that they have taught or plan to teach using the STAY Social and Emotional Learning framework developed by Dr. Yorel Lashley to create their own plans and foundational routines based on the SEL and academic demands and opportunities in the subject(s) they teach. This workshop will support both educators yet-to-begin integrated social and emotional learning teaching as well educators who have started down that path without fully-integrating SEL and/or establishing youth empowerment as the explicit developmental outcome of all learning.

Speaker: Yorel Lashley

Age Range: Elementary school, Middle school, High school

Theme: All

1:30–2:45 p.m., Virtual Story Building: Three Ways!

In this interactive workshop, participants will learn three different strategies to create stories collaboratively with their students on a virtual platform. These strategies can also be used in person.  The first approach is to create an Ad Lib story in which the teacher creates the outline and asks students to fill in blank spaces with parts of speech (noun, adjective, etc.) to flesh out the story. The students can later act out the story they’ve created or use the story as inspiration for independent creative writing projects. The second approach is using the phrase “Somebody/Wanted/But/So/Then” as a guide to build a story outline. The teacher asks students for a Somebody (who’s this story about?), what that “somebody” Wants, But (what gets in their way), So (what do they do about it?) and Then (how does it end?). Once this outline has been created, the teacher can break the story up into scenes for students to act out or write, building off of the outline to create a fuller story. The last approach is to review a story that students have learned and ask them to break up the story by identifying the beginning, middle, and end through tableaux (having students create frozen scenes of the story’s three parts). This approach also celebrates using the storytelling opportunities that working in a Zoom box as a stage can create. The goal of this workshop is for participants to leave with new strategies to engage students in collaborative storytelling and for these approaches to hopefully inspire ways to engage students in literacy and English classes through storytelling and drama pedagogy.

Speaker: Jenna Grossman Spiers

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school, Middle school

Theme: Cultural Relevance, SEL

3:00–4:00 p.m., Picture Books as a Vehicle for Exploring Disability Inclusion

Children read the pictures in story books before they are ever able to read words, and these tools are a staple in every early childhood and elementary classroom. But how might illustrations and text work together to inform children’s developing beliefs and behaviors toward their peers? The characters, illustrations, and stories in children’s literature give us an entry point to consider representations of difference. They allow students to interrogate assumptions, emotions, and beliefs about the range of abilities and behaviors they encounter in the classroom and beyond. Through this interactive session, we will establish the basis of disability prejudice in young children and explore the ways that art in children’s literature can be used to advance social-emotional learning in young children to build awareness, understanding, and acceptance of peers with disabilities. We will discuss practical ways to integrate visual art with language arts curriculum, social-emotional learning, and social justice themes.

Speaker: Jill Jaworski

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school

Theme: SEL

3:00–4:00 p.m., Teaching through Magic

I firmly believe everyone can perform Magic. Yes, you can do Magic! In fact, Magic is a great educational tool for the development of Social and Emotional Learning.

Magic is an excellent ally for all teachers and teaching artists who want to better engage with their students, improve their school climate, and promote social and emotional skills. This art form allows us to share stories visually, build relationships, and fascinatingly work in emotions.

In this workshop, you will learn a Magic trick to perform in front of your students while delivering a story. You will also learn another Magic trick to teach your students. Most importantly, you will become more aware of your own emotions, your student’s emotions and discover how to create a real magical learning experience.

We have heard many times the word empathy, but what is empathy? How do we measure empathy? Are we as empathetic as we think? And most importantly, how could we support empathy through Magic?

As teachers, magicians need an engaged and collaborative audience to create a memorable, fantastic show. Empathy is a great skill that can be used to engage better with your students. The success of the performance depends on both the audience and the magician. This is also true for the teacher and their students. That is why I want to teach you the Magic principles and how to use Magic to promote self-esteem, resilience, communication skills, creativity, and SEL.

This workshop will serve as an introduction to the use of Magic for the promotion of the skills mentioned above.

You will discover how Magic can help you capture your student’s attention and how attention is vital for SEL.
Magicians are experts in knowing how audiences are feeling and thinking. Because to make our audience feel good, included in the show, and safe, we need to read their minds as accurately as possible. Teachers can develop this skill to know their own and their student’s emotions and thoughts more accurately.

Also, I would like to show you how Magic can prevent the appearance of violence and can serve as a great tool to cope with stress, anxiety, and sadness. After 20 years of performing Magic, I know this Art form can bring joy and unity in challenging scenarios. Let me show you how you can perform Magic! Let me share with you how you can promote SEL! Let me prove to you that you are the real Magic!

Speaker: Manuel Oliver

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school, Middle school, High school

Theme: SEL

3:00–4:00 p.m., Culturally Responsive Music Teaching in Urban Schools

Culturally Responsive Music Teaching in Urban Schools will aim to enlighten and encourage educators from all facets of music education. All will be inspired—from the first-year teacher to the well-seasoned 20-year tenured teacher—by getting an inside look at the urban students’ perspective as it relates to the arts. Growing up in the city and attending a predominately African American school, opportunities were slim to none. Most students dropped out, got pregnant, affiliated with gangs, or dabbled in drugs. In my presentation, I will passionately talk about how to effectively teach music by integrating diverse works, linguistic expressions common to students, and ultimately foster the confidence of students. Transparently, I will share my experiences throughout the tenure of my education and share what I have learned in order to reach all students no matter the ethnic, cultural, and race difference. As a first-generation college graduate, it is my overarching goal to leave every listener with a fresh perspective on how to relate, stay relevant, and educate ALL students.

Speaker: Chadijah Craig

Age Range: High school

Theme: Cultural Relevance, SEL

3:00–4:00 p.m., Teaching Music Virtually in a SEL-focused "Classroom"

Music naturally aligns with social-emotional learning.  The integration of music with SEL can support healthy, stimulating, and thriving classrooms. This workshop will shine light on the authentic and natural parallels that exist between music concepts/classes and SEL competencies. Various strategies will be presented to help build community and successfully teach music in a virtual “classroom,” all while keeping our focus on the needs of our students.

Speaker: Shawna Longo

Age Range: Early childhood, Elementary school

Theme: SEL, Virtual

4:00–5:00 p.m., Community of Practice Sessions

Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium (WAIS) Community of Practice (CoP) provides an opportunity to engage with peers about strategies and challenges and to celebrate successes. CoPs will meet three to four times over six months and will feature structured conversations facilitated by experts. CoPs will be organized around WAIS themes which are responsive to the pressing challenges of our time, including the challenges of teaching during a pandemic, racial justice, and supporting the social and emotional wellbeing of students. Outputs of CoPs may include a list of successes and challenges, observations about the state of the field, or a white paper outlining policy strategies. Facilitators will be introduced on Saturday, February 13 (recording will be available), and participants will have the opportunity to select a CoP based on their topic of interest. This is an opportunity to engage in a supportive community while contributing to the field of Arts Integration.

WHAT OUR PARTICIPANTS ARE SAYING

"I loved that there were so many different workshops to choose from with a wide range of skills.”

“Presenters were very knowledgeable and willing to answer questions and clarify.”

The Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium is Sponsored by:

Any Given Child Madison Logo

The Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium is presented by UW–Madison Community Arts Collaboratory in partnership with:

Madison Metropolitan School District Logo                   Overture Center for the Arts Logo

Contact

If you have questions about the Wisconsin Arts Integration Symposium, please email UW Community Arts Collaboratory Operations Manager Stephanie Richards at slrichards@wisc.edu.