Early Career Teaching Institute

Educators from Wisconsin and beyond are invited to the UW-Madison School of Education (SoE) Early Career Teaching Institute, a one-week, in-person, intensive learning experience for pre-K-12 educators who are SoE alumni. Participants will have at least one year of teaching experience and plan to teach the subsequent school year.

The five-day institute invites educators to gather as a collaborative community committed to advancing justice in the classroom, deepening content knowledge, improving instruction, and sharing habits and practices for thriving in the teaching profession.

The central questions for the Institute are: 

  • How does/can our teaching deepen students’ sense of belonging? 
  • How can we deepen our own sense of belonging in the teaching profession, and in our professional contexts/communities?

Participants receive:

  • A $575 stipend for participation
  • Room expenses paid for up to four nights while supply lasts (checking in Monday, July 25, 2022, and checking out Friday, July 29, 2022)
  • Small-group engagement with educators in similar roles and subject areas. These interactive workshop strands are led by UW faculty/staff experts and provide opportunities for in-depth exploration and application to participants’ contexts.
  • Whole-group learning experiences, such as writing and reflection exercises, keynote speakers, and engagement around approaches to sustainable teaching.
  • Whole-group meals and social events. These gatherings provide participants and instructors with opportunities to connect within and across content areas and geographic regions. 
  • Opportunities for optional academic-year virtual programming
  • The opportunity to receive a UW-Madison School of Education Certificate of Participation upon successful completion of all required components of the institute.

This event is hosted by the UW–Madison School of Education Teacher Education Center and office of Professional Learning and Community Education (PLACE). This partnership is made possible by the generosity of Mary T. and Ted D. Kellner, the Kellner Badger for Life Fund, the Dan Mindich Teacher Project Fund, and the Peggy Porter Glick Fund.

When:
Monday, July 25, noon-4 p.m.
Tues-Thurs. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., with optional evening social events
Friday, July 29, 8:30 a.m.-noon

Where:
Discovery Building, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Program Fee (non-refundable): $50*

*This special rate is made possible by the generosity of Mary T. and Ted D. Kellner, the Kellner Badger for Life Fund, the Dan Mindich Teacher Project Fund, and the Peggy Porter Glick Fund.

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Keynote

Juliana Urtubey

Juliana Urtubey, has been an educator for 11 years. She teaches at Kermit R. Booker, Sr. Innovative Elementary School in Las Vegas, where she serves as a co-teacher in pre-kindergarten through fifth-grade special education settings and as an instructional strategist developing supports to meet students’ differing academic, social-emotional, and behavioral needs.

 

Known as “Ms. Earth” for her efforts to beautify schools and unify the community through murals and gardens, Urtubey has helped raise funds for garden programs at two Las Vegas schools. In one program, the garden was tended to by the student “Garden Gnomies” club and offered opportunities for innovative student learning and intergenerational learning and connections to the wider community.

 

As the 2021 National Teacher of the Year (NTOY), Urtubey will spend a year representing educators and serving as an ambassador for students and teachers across the nation. She advocates for a “joyful and just education” for all students, one that is inclusive and celebratory of all students’ identities, families and communities.

Session Descriptions

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Breakout Session 1: Tuesday, July 26 | 10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Option A: Resisting Asian American Invisibility
Reported incidents of anti-Asian racism have increased significantly since the start of the pandemic. This workshop examines the roots of anti-Asian racism in US history and examines the stereotypes that frame Asian American experiences. We will also discuss the ethnic, cultural, linguistic, social class, and generational diversity of Asian America. Presented by: Stacey J. Lee

Option B: Understanding and Supporting Trans Youth and their Families
This workshop will focus on best practices in supporting trans and nonbinary youth, as well as how to support their families as they navigate social and medical transition processes. We will discuss the general landscape of experiences that trans and nonbinary youth may experience in schools and the research that outlines gender-based stress for the youth and their families. In addition, I will provide information about how to talk to parents and caregivers who are struggling with their youth’s gender as well as providing resources for supporting trans and nonbinary youth in Wisconsin. The workshop will end with a Q&A. Presented by: Stephanie Budge

Option C: Responsive Instruction: Implementing Act 31 & Engaging Students With Accessible, Inclusive PBS Resources
Responsive teaching involves meeting the needs of your students and adhering to district mandates. This two-part session will give you the opportunity to get practical, engaging guidance in both realms. The first half of the session will cover implementation of WI Act 31, requiring schools to teach the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of American Indians in Wisconsin. The second half will focus on grade level and content area needs with facilitated dialogue and resource-sharing, including a variety of WI-based resources for 3rd-8th grade, and other multimedia from PBS LearningMedia, all of which can be readily integrated into existing curricula. Presented by: Michael Hartwell, Jami Hoekstra Collins, and David O’Connor

Option D: Loupe-y With Wonder
This workshop encourages participants to cultivate a sense of wonder by observing up close using a simple tool, a jeweler’s loupe. Participants will learn a process of inquiry which includes seeing, writing analogies, drawing, and theorizing. Participants will engage in hands on experiences developing their own sense of wonder to in turn share that sense of wonder with their students. Facilitators believe, “we teach who we are,” so we will spend time delving into the important question of “who am I and how does this affect who I am as an educator?” This workshop will have a focus on the natural world and it’s wonders. Presented by: Bridget Christenson and Mary Hayes

Breakout Session 2: Tuesday, July 26 | 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Option A: Building Media Literacy Skills with Wisconsin’s Learners
Do your students know how to determine the credibility of media and safely participate in online spaces? This session will introduce the PBS Media Literacy certification program, a free resource from PBS Wisconsin. Join two fully certified educators to learn how to create a code of conduct that spans physical and virtual spaces, discover tools and strategies for evaluating online information, and begin planning how to implement media projects with students. This session will provide a jump start to begin earning credentials and provide tools to help your students build future-ready critical thinking skills as producers and consumers of media. Presented by: Jen Kobylecky, Jaclyn Jecha, and Katie Miller

Option B: Beyond the PTO: Towards Equitable and Racially Just Family-School Partnerships:
In this interactive workshop, participants will: 1) learn about different forms of parent/caregiver engagement in education and reflect on their own conceptions of “engaged” parents and families (and the implications of those conceptions); 2) learn about specific examples and cases that illustrate the possibilities and pitfalls in working towards equitable and racially just family-school partnerships; 3) begin to apply what they’ve learned to their own planning and practice as educators. Presented by: Linn Posey-Maddox

Option C: Leadership Opportunities for Teachers: Leading From the Classroom
We will examine leadership practice including the work of leadership teams and teachers centering a more collaborative approach to leadership anchored in equity. Educators have opportunities to provide leadership in many areas within the school and district. This session will identify and explore these opportunities. Presented by: Dr. Barbara Sramek and Dr. Tina Salzman

Option D: The Power of Our Names
Although names play a critical role in early literacy and language learning, the names of children who are linguistically and/or racially minoritized are often changed or mispronounced in schools. In this workshop, we’ll explore how an inquiry into names and naming practices through reading, writing, art, and talk can strengthen children’s community and belonging in early childhood and elementary classrooms. Presented by: Emily Machado

Breakout Session 3: Wednesday, July 27 | 10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Option A: Social-Emotional and Trauma-Informed Frames for Equitable Teaching for ALL Learners
Learn, share, and collaborate around classroom practices that come from a trauma-informed lens, designed to create spaces where students (and we) can show-up as their/our authentic selves to maximize academic risk-taking and achievement. Presented by: Jen Murphy

Option B: Facilitating Small Group and Whole Discussions
We will discuss strategies to uncover students’ thinking and facilitate students’ learning in small groups. We will also explore how to bring the ideas that students might have discussed in their small groups to the whole class discussion, and strategies for synthesizing ideas during whole class discussions to more dynamically scaffold students’ learning of important concepts, relationships, and practices. Presented by: Sadhana Puntambekar and Dana Gnesdilow

Option C: MetaRubric: A Game for Reflection on Assessment and Learning
MetaRubric is a game where teams of educators negotiate criteria for rubrics. What qualities might we look for in rubrics and how might they be used? Sound fun? It really is. Presented by: Peter Wardrip, YJ Kim, and Peter Kirschmann

Option D: Introducing and Developing Gender-Inclusive Practices
In this workshop, we will discuss gender-inclusive policies and practices. The session will start with a brief overview of the policy context concerning transgender and gender-expansive people in schools. Participants will then discuss practical strategies to incorporate more inclusive instructional practices and curriculum. Presented by: Dr. Mollie T. McQuillan

Breakout Session 4: Wednesday, July 27 | 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Option A: Co-Teaching and Planning for Inclusive School Settings
This workshop will include a presentation of effective, evidence-based models of co-teaching, scenarios for practical analysis and implementation, and opportunities to discuss effective co-teaching strategies in inclusive school settings. We will discuss ways to pre-plan collaboratively, including assessing successes and determining goals. In this interactive session, participants will develop a structured co-teaching action plan for future implementation. Presented by: Heather Dahl

Option B: “Wholeness is No Trifling Matter”: Race, Discipline Disparities, and Restorative Justice
Racialized discipline disparities continue to plague schools across the United States. Schools have increasingly employed restorative justice (RJ) as a mechanism to reduce discipline disparities. This workshop will explore the elements of restorative justice and consider how RJ can be used for educational equity broadly and to improve school culture and students’ sense of belonging specifically. Presented by: Kevin Lawrence Henry, Jr.

Option C: Playful Assessment: How Can You Bring Fun and Joy to Assessment?
In this hands-on session, teachers can learn about principles of playful assessment and apply them to their own assessment tools and activities to make their assessment more robust yet fun. Presented by: YJ Kim, Andy Stoiber, and Peter Kirschmann

Option D: Welcome to PurpleState!
This workshop will engage participants in learning key concepts and pedagogies for use in a simulation designed for civics and government classes called PurpleState. The simulation places students in the role of political consultants who use real data and information to design state level media campaigns on state policy issues. The workshop will provide opportunities for participants to engage in the simulation and learn how to implement it or adapt it for their classes. Goals include increases in argumentation skills, media literacy, and self-efficacy for civic engagement. Presented by: Jeremy Stoddard and Derek Behnke

Option E: Making the Most of the CCBC as a Resource
You may already be familiar with the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC). This session will go deeper into how the CCBC can support your work in the classroom, whether it’s helping you discover books that align to areas of the curriculum, or providing information and support when there are concerns about or challenges to specific materials. We’ll also dive into our work documenting diversity in books for youth and highlight how you can make use of the resources we’ve created and curated to find high-quality diverse books. And of course we’ll share some great new books for PreK-Grade 12. Presented by: Megan Schliesman and Madeline Tyner

Breakout Session 5: Thursday, July 28 | 10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Option A: Humanizing Education for Immigrant and Refugee Youth
This workshop outlines 20 strategies that educators can engage in the classroom, across schools, and with the broader community to humanize education for immigrant and refugee youth. It includes access to a website with lists of resources. Presented by: Lesley Bartlett

Option B: Teachers as Policy Advocates
Teachers constantly navigate federal, state, district, and school level policies but rarely are at the table when these policies are created. You will engage with facilitators from Wisconsin Education Policy Outreach and Practice (WEPOP) at UW–Madison in critical dialogue on the nuances of policy and policymaking, your role as a policy agent and advocate, and how you can create meaningful and sustainable policy action plans. You will leave this workshop with not only a deeper understanding of your role in policymaking and advocacy, but also with a policy action plan. Presented by: Annalee Good, Molly Carrol, Kate Roberts, Deonte Iverson, Latoya Holiday, and Shahanna McKinney-Baldon

Option C: Exploring Elena Aguilar’s Onward: Cultivating Emotional Resilience in Educators
Join Elementary Education cohort mentors and peers in learning the tools and practices laid out by Aguilar and others for cultivating emotional awareness and resilience while acknowledging the challenges of complex systemic issues in education. Plan actionable steps to take throughout the school year that will sustain your passion for teaching and professional wellbeing. Presented by: Mary Klehr, Evan Moss, and Emily Wight

Option D: Creating Inclusive Classroom Communities for Newcomers, Refugees, and Students with Limited and Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE)
Together we will explore issues of educational equity and access for newcomer, refugee, and SLIFE (students with limited/interrupted formal education) multilingual learners through the lenses of advocacy, practice, and collaboration. Through a case study protocol, teachers will explore how to leverage their knowledge and resources to meet student needs. Teachers will also examine practical curricular resources to actively involve students in classroom activities. Teachers will be supported in mapping their allies in advocacy in their local context. Presented by: Kaycee Rogers and Lisa Velarde

Breakout Session 6: Thursday, July 28 | 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Option A: How to Teach Writing for Peace
This two-hour workshop will make a case for teaching writing as an instrument of personal and social change. Drawing from research and experience teaching in post-war Colombia, participants will be led through strategies for: creating an environment propitious for writing for peace, inviting students to write for peace, and interpreting students’ writing. Special attention will be paid to how such approaches line up with the newly revised Wisconsin ELA standards. Presented by: Kate Vieira

Option B: Creativity and Art as Processing
This hands-on workshop uses process and reflection through art making. Reflect on both your school year experience as well as your experience from this past week. Create a concertina style gratitude journal using a single sheet of paper. Explore texturing the paper. Customize your own small journal and discuss techniques for daily use. We will also explore both mindfulness and goals setting. Learn tips and techniques to quiet and focus your mind. Activities include a guided visualization, mind mapping, free writing and creating concrete action steps to work towards your creative teaching goals. Presented by: Angela Johnson

Option C: Powerful Play for Learning
Play is NOT just for preschool. Children learn through play, but they learn different things depending on the role that their teacher takes. In this session we’ll explore the Spectrum of Play and how teachers can confidently use it to support learning across academic and social domains. Presented by: Beth Graue, Erica Ramberg, and Daisy Chang

Option D: Creating Inclusive Classroom Communities for Newcomers, Refugees, and Students with Limited and Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE)
Together we will explore issues of educational equity and access for newcomer, refugee, and SLIFE (students with limited/interrupted formal education) multilingual learners through the lenses of advocacy, practice, and collaboration. Through a case study protocol, teachers will explore how to leverage their knowledge and resources to meet student needs. Teachers will also examine practical curricular resources to actively involve students in classroom activities. Teachers will be supported in mapping their allies in advocacy in their local context. Presented by: Kaycee Rogers and Lisa Velarde

Program Coordinators

Lisa Barker

Executive Director

Mark Dziedzic

Greater Madison Writing Project Director

Kelly Hayek

Interim Associate Director, Teacher Education Center

Kimber Wilkerson

Professor of Special Education and Faculty Director of the School of Education’s Teacher Education Center